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Pistachio Butter Cake 05.07.2009

Posted by Dan Sheehan in Portfolio, Recipes.
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3 comments

Whoops, a little overflow on the left.  Trim with a knife.This Pistachio cake is flavored with cardamom and orange zest.  It might be good with green tea steeped in the milk…another time perhaps.  Other spices are optional.  Bread and Buttress loves nutmeg.  You will see that pretty much a constant in everything here.  Note that the eggs are not separated.  If you are not using an electric mixer, separate the eggs.  Add the yolks to the creamed butter/sugar.  Undermix the flour into the wets and fold in the egg whites (beaten to stiff peaks.  This is easier with whites at room temp and with a pinch of salt added).  You will need:

  • Three 8” cake pans (about 4 cups each)
  • Electric mixer (not needed, but the more powerful the better)
  • Spice grinder or clean coffee grinder
  • Scale
  • Cooling Racks
  • 1.25 cups unsalted butter (2.5 sticks)
  • 2.5 cups sugar
  • 8 eggs

Pull the butter and let it sit out overnight.  Cream the butter and sugar together for about 10 minutes.  It’ll become white.  Add whole eggs, one at a time.  Let each incorporate.  After they’re all in, scrape the sides to incorporate and mix for a few more seconds.

  • 1 package Jello Pistachio Pudding
  • 1.5 cups milk
  • ½ t vanilla extract
  • 1-2 t orange zest (one small orange)

Stir together the milk and pudding in a measuring cup with a fork and add to the creamed butter and eggs.  Toss in the vanilla and zest.  Mix.  Scrape.  Mix.

  • 2.5 cups AP flour, sifted
  • 2 cups raw pistachios, ground
  • 1.5 T baking powder
  • 0.5 t salt
  • 1.5 t cardamom
  • 0.25 t anise
  • 0.25 t nutmeg (the secret ingredient to everything!)

Chunk, not smooth.  Some flour clumping is a-ok.Sift flour into a bowl.  Grind pistachios into a meal (use a Ziploc bag and crush ‘em with a soup can if you don’t have a grinder) and add to the flour along with the other dry ingredients and spices.  Add the drys to the wets in three (or so) parts.  Go slowly.  Don’t make the mix creamy!  Mix until the added drys are almost incorporated then add another portion.  This will leave some air in the mix and will help make a fluffier cake.

Toss into greased and floured pans (8 inch round shown) Bake at 350 for 35-50 minutes.  Remove, cool on racks.

For the buttercream frosting go here.

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Kay’s Famous Pistachio Cake 05.07.2009

Posted by Dan Sheehan in BnB.
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2 comments

Mmmm, pistachio buttercream lattice and caramel brittle!We here at BnB firmly believe in the power taste has over memory, especially sweets.  Surely you have a specific food that makes you remember a certain moment in time or feeling.

For Bread and Buttress, Grandma’s pistachio cake makes us remember childhood picnics on her backyard deck under a fringed yellow umbrella.  Swing music would be playing on ancient speakers fastened to the brick exterior of the house by Grandpa.  Every time this cake is made, we take a little trip down memory lane.

When we learned that Passages NW was holding its annual Courage benefit, duty called.  We wanted the Pistachio Cake to take part in their frantic dessert auction.  Passages is a Seattle organization that empowers young girls and build community through carefully tailored outdoor programs.  It’s an organization our Grandmother would have appreciated.

Now, Grandma was no slouch but, growing up through the depression, she was thrifty.  Her original recipe for the pistachio cake displayed as much.  For example, boxed vanilla cake mix saved her some time.  Walnuts, similar in texture to pistachios were substituted in the batter. Jello pudding mix lent pistachio flavor to the cake.

Well, as you’ll see, some changes were made.  We’re making a scratch cake here folks, with a few additional embellishments.  However, we could never think of substituting the Jello.  (Ok, if you’re not into the animal gelatin, try pistachio paste).  Grandma always used a plain and super sugary American style buttercream frosting.  We decided to try a pistachio buttercream frosting in the Swiss tradition.  But fear not, the sweetness of the sugar can still be found in the pistachio brittle that tops the cake.  Find the cake recipe here, and buttercream here.  Finally, Grandma’s original recipe.

The finished cake at the Passages NW auction

The finished cake at the Passages NW auction